The use of a foam or inflatable (IPS) thoraco-pelvic support devices could limit the risk on intraoperative acquired pressure ulcers

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Technical note: A pilot study mapping the interface pressure of thoraco-pelvic support devices used for spinal surgery in the prone position.

This study investigates the interface pressure of four commonly used thoraco-pelvic support devices (Fig. 1): foam cushion, inflatable supports (IPS), Wilson frame and Steffee blocks. Each device was evaluated in three healthy subjects after positioning them awake on the device. A pressure mapping system was used to measure the interface pressure. Peak pressure (Fig. 1) and mean pressure values (Fig. 3) were analyzed, and a pressure mapping image (Fig. 4) was created for each device

The peak and mean interface pressure were 40% and 50% lower for both the foam cushions and inflatable support device, respectively, compared to the Wilson frame and Steffee blocks (p < 0.005). In addition, pressure mapping images showed more equal pressure redistribution in the foam cushions and inflatable support device.

P.R.A.M. Depauw, G.J. Rutten, E. Van Eeckhoven, D. Jansen Tweet

Figure 1-2-3: The four positioning devices with peak and mean pressure

Figure 4: When considering a threshold of 150 mmHg the inflatable supports showed no compression area’s but the Wilson frame and Steffee showed significant areas at risk.

P.R.A.M. Depauw, G.J. Rutten, E. Van Eeckhoven, T. Defossez, D. Jansen

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